142 Lords with financial interest in private healthcare companies allowed to vote in support of the Health and Social Care Act.

Hackney journalist discovers 142 Lords who voted on Health and Social Care Act have links to private healthcare companies

Emma Bartholomew, Senior
Reporter
Monday, October 22, 2012
6:55 PM

Hackney investigative journalist Andrew Robertson has discovered 142 Lords have links with private healthcare companies – but were still allowed to vote in support of the Health and Social Care Act.

Mr Robertson believes this is a
conflict of interest, and should have meant they were exempt from voting – in the same way councillors would be. “In February when the House of
Lords was debating the Bill I had a look at the register of interests to see what their connections are, they were chairs of companies that were
interested in private health, they had shares in these companies,” Mr Robertson told a public meeting in Stoke Newington two weeks ago,
organised to discuss the
goverment’s NHS reform.

“So here is a Lord, he is the chairman of Aviva private health insurance and he is allowed to vote on the Health and Social Care Bill which will weaken the public sector services and benefit Aviva.

“The point isn’t that they haven’t registered their interests, it’s that they have these interests and in addition to that they are able to vote,” he added.

“If they are to remain public servants rather than corporate servants the rules are not fit for purpose.” The House of Lords debates legislation, and its 762 Lords have the power to amend or reject bills.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Health said all members had registered their interests as required.

For more information see
http://www.socialinvestigations.blogspot.co.uk.
See The Hackney Gazette this Thursday for a double-page
spread detailing the government’s NHS reform
plans and how you can join the campaign
organised by the Hackney Coalition to Save the
NHS.

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Bank Charges?

Today RBS announces its exit of the APS (Asset Protection Scheme.)

We the public have helped to save the skins of RBS shareholders and bondholders and have received a paltry 5bn over five years for having insured £282bn at a time when no business on earth would have considered doing so for the same money and the same unclarified risk.

That is the Balls up you inevitably get when you let any government run a business. It is my opinion that we have undercharged the bank by some £45bn at a minimum and possibly much more than that.

It seems that the more zeros they put at the end the less the public, and the governments, understand

What interest rate is RBS charging you? Less than 1%, I doubt it.

“the economy is absolutely screwed” Says Conservative MP

Former Conservative Cabinet Minister Lord Forsyth said  on the Daily Politics on Tuesday 9th October:

“I think we have got fixated with reducing the deficit – of course we have got to reduce the deficit but the way to reduce the deficit is to get growth going again and I think what was lacking in the speech from the Chancellor was any indication, other than this scheme for equity and small businesses, was any indication of how he is going to get small and medium sized businesses roaring ahead again and that is the only way forward…. It feels a bit like Mister Micawber – he is hoping something will turn up when the numbers come out.”

Yet Tory MP Mark Garnier was more honest still, speaking at a fringe meeting today he said:

“The reason we have a low interest rate is because the economy is absolutely screwed”

The chancellor’s speech was obviously well received then…

 

The truth about the pension fund charges ‘scandal’

Labour leader Ed Milliband has stirred up the debate over investment charges calling them a ‘rip off’. Are they?

The Lolly : www.citywire.co.uk/

The truth about the pension fund charges ‘scandal’.

 

free_professional_pension_review_image4_contact_us

Ikea

I understand it is an anniversary of Ikea, 25 years of trading in the UK or something similar today. Well I have just climbed the stairs of the Thurrock store at 11- 30 am to find the restaurant full and store busy so another 25 years seems a safe bet if this is Ikea in a recession